? for Dan Theodore

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? for Dan Theodore

Postby Digital Dan » Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:13 am

I hear you're shooting a .38 bore with polygonal rifling? Who made the barrel?
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Postby Digital Dan » Fri Oct 13, 2006 5:59 pm

Anybody know the answer?
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Postby Keith lay » Sat Oct 14, 2006 7:25 am

Not Dan here but Pac-Nor made the barrel.
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Postby EDWARD MALINOWSKI » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:55 pm

I wonder how much Dan paid for it.
I guess that he dispelled the "myth" about if from Glock.

"The manufacturer GLOCK advises against using lead bullets (meaning bullets not covered by a copper jacket) in their polygonally rifled barrels, which has lead to a widespread belief that polygonal rifling is not compatible with lead bullets. Noted firearms expert Gale McMillan has also commented that lead bullets and polygonal rifling are not a good mix. However, since neither H&K nor Kahr recommend against lead bullets in their polygonal rifled barrels, it is probable that there is an additional factor involved in GLOCK's warning. One explanation is that GLOCK barrels have a fairly sharp transition between the chamber and the rifling, and this area is prone to lead buildup if lead bullets are used. This buildup may result in failures to fully return to battery and, and this may allow the gun to fire with the case not fully supported by the chamber, leading to a potentially dangerous case failure. The other explanation is that GLOCK's barrels may be more prone than normal to leading (the buildup of lead in the bore that happens in nearly all firearms firing high velocity lead bullets) for some unknown reason. This lead buildup must be cleaned out regularly, or the barrel can become constricted and result in higher than normal pressures."

I'm sure he did and there is probably some difference in Pac-Nor's polygonal rifling than Glocks. Plus better lubes.

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Polygon rifling/

Postby beltfed » Sat Oct 14, 2006 7:29 pm

Hey, this is nothing new. actually the early Metford and Henry rifling and the slightly later Pope rifling is VERY similar to so called Polygonal rifling and the former were specifically designed for lead bullets and black powder to minimize "corners" in the rifling profile so as to minimize fouling buildup

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Postby ND Sharpshooter » Sun Oct 15, 2006 7:21 am

Glock drops their warranty if you use reloaded ammo of any sort in their firearms. One reason, especially with their 40 S&W's, is that Glocks don't fully support the rear end of the case and some used cases may already be weak in the web area. Glock shooters talk about KA-BOOMS a lot due to the case rupturing in that unsupported area in the feedramp part of the barrel. Until you have a KA-BOOM you wonder if all those fellers are overloading their 40's. They may have been overloading; however, I wasn't. One K-B was enough! They may have corrected this problem in the last 3-4 years---I stopped going on the Glock forums after my K-B so I don't know if they have made any changes.
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Postby Digital Dan » Sun Oct 15, 2006 9:34 pm

Thanks Keith, appreciate that info.

Dunno if it's a good thing or bad, just doing a little research. IIRC Harry Pope's barrels get a passin' grade on the target line. Somewhat more interested in extrapolation into the realm of the Whitworth theory...bullets to match the bore. Also know that it's not required to make them shoot, but....

Metford pattern...yeah but that's not what I was lookin' fer. That and the Lee pattern faded out after a brief tour on the line, or so my memory states.

Don't giddy-up from sic 'em about Glocks and all their weird ways...don't wanna either.
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Postby RMulhern » Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:14 am

ND Sharpshooter wrote:Glock drops their warranty if you use reloaded ammo of any sort in their firearms. One reason, especially with their 40 S&W's, is that Glocks don't fully support the rear end of the case and some used cases may already be weak in the web area. Glock shooters talk about KA-BOOMS a lot due to the case rupturing in that unsupported area in the feedramp part of the barrel. Until you have a KA-BOOM you wonder if all those fellers are overloading their 40's. They may have been overloading; however, I wasn't. One K-B was enough! They may have corrected this problem in the last 3-4 years---I stopped going on the Glock forums after my K-B so I don't know if they have made any changes.


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Postby martinibelgian » Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:01 am

Dan,
Actually the Metford disappeared because of the appearance of the more erosive single base nitro powder (cordite) - it was so bad on the soft steels used then, that it washed away the shallow rifling quite quickly - but it also was considered as the ultimate form of rifling for BP LR use, being quite tolerant of fouling. In actual fact, Metford rifling ruled the range in the UK till the Nitro powders and rifles came along. Which meant indeed it wasn't used all that long - but it was considered one of the best for BP use.
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Postby Digital Dan » Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:32 pm

I vaguely recall that MB, not sure if such would serve my purposes well regardless. Leaning toward a paper patch shooter...cross patches that is. In any case it might be difficult to replicate the Metford pattern these days...
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Postby Brent » Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:05 pm

DD,
The Metford should work very well indeed with paper patches, most especially cross patches.

Ron Snover makes a dandy Metford barrel as does Bobby Hoyt I believe.

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Postby HpGuy420 » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:52 pm

Έχετε μια υπέροχη ζωή.
Last edited by HpGuy420 on Mon Mar 18, 2013 4:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby martinibelgian » Tue Oct 17, 2006 5:17 am

Digital Dan,
Brent is right - Metford rifling was originally conceived for and used by the Rigby ML match rifles, and later by - among others - the Farquharson BL match rifles. All of these shot PP bullets as a rule, not those 'naked' American GG bullets... :wink:
In actual fact, Metford-barreled rifles usually took most of the prizes during the Wimbledon comps.
It was the 1st shallow-groove rifling form to be used, and Ron Snover makes a nice Metford segmental rifling barrel indeed.
Another interesting one as regards BP fouling should be the Lancaster oval bore - not an angle anywhere. They were considered as difficult to load for in ML rifles, but quite accurate in BL's, with the advantage of handling fouling very well. Problem is - no one makes an oval-bore barrel these days...
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Postby Digital Dan » Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:03 pm

Well there ya go. Thanks guys, learnt somethin' today after all! :lol:
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Postby Digital Dan » Wed Oct 18, 2006 6:54 am

Before letting this slip into obscurity, any of you fellas know anything about Harry Pope's barrels? Specifically, the rifling pattern he used? Know about his 'choke', wondering about the rest. Thanks.
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