Caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)

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TexasMac
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Caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)

Post by TexasMac » Tue Nov 08, 2016 12:34 am

Just received a Browning .45-70 BPCR that’s in good condition, but for some unknown reason the previous owner made sure the rear Browning soule tang sight base could not be removed. It’s common to find Loctite used on the base screws but, in addition to Loctite, the screw heads were also staked in place. Since the sight base has to be removed prior to removing the stock & full disassembly, I had to cut the counter sunk heads off in a drill press and drill out the screw shanks. Fortunately I was able to remove the screws without damaging the sight base. It seems that just about every used rifle is an adventure.

Following is a list of conditions and problems I’ve run into while purchasing used Browning’s for resale; conditions that were not identified by the sellers. None were factory problems, but the direct result of, shooter abuse, ignorance or intentional misrepresentation by the seller.

• Two with ringed chambers.
• Pitted bores – one was obvious. The other one required a bore scope to identify.
• Forearm bedded (glued) to the forearm hanger and barrel.
• Both mainsprings shortened, which resulted in the hammer intermittently catching in the ½ cock position when fired.
• Damaged front sight required some machine work and replacement of the spirit level vial.
• Cracked front sight spirit level vial, and vial housing end cap missing (very common).
• Front sight insert nut forced into the housing and cross-threaded.
• Front sight insert nut epoxied into the housing, ruining the front sight. I can only imagine this was done because the nut was cross threaded and the threads destroyed.
• Dings and scratches, some very deep, in the metal and wood which were not described in the listing or mentioned by the seller.
• Cracked stocks, usually around the wrist and tang. Although I’ve received at least 5 rifles with stocks that were clearly cracked or broken during shipping; a couple were clearly cracked prior to being shipped. Unfortunately this is somewhat of a common problem and one of the
worse to run into since the shipper resists accepting blame and the seller resists refunding the rifle fee and shipping costs. To have the factory replace a stock costs over $500.
• Several with “McGee” trigger modification, which were not mentioned by sellers. Some resellers were most likely not aware the modification had been made by the previous owner.
• “McGee” trigger modification incorrectly installed that damaged the threads for the stock through-bolt.
• J&B trigger modifications which were broken off. Required drilling out the modification and replacing with an original trigger pull adjustment screw and spring.
• A couple of rifles with stocks that were crudely coated with a shinny varnish or lacquer. Had to strip and properly refinished.
• Several had filthy actions and some internal corrosion which would have been impossible to clean without completely disassembling the action. Routine proper cleaning would have prevented this.
• One broken sear spring.
• Several damaged rear soule sight base screw heads.
• A couple of damaged rear soule sights with missing parts.
• One rusted rear soule sight required disassembly and some parts replaced.
• Rusted rear soule sight base bottom, which was still attached to the tang with banged up screws.
• Scope base mounting screw twisted off in the hole. Had to be drilled out & threads cleaned up.
• And this one really caught me by surprise. Barrel was loose and rotated in the receiver while disassembling the action and trying to figure out why the lever and extractor hung up. Barrel was removed, threads checked, barrel installed properly and headspace checked. No more problems. Assuming the rifle did not leave the factory in this condition; most likely someone switched out and did not properly install the barrel.

Wayne
NRA Life (President's Council) Member, TSRA Life Member, NSSF Member
Click on http://www.texas-mac.com/index.html to my home page containing information on my Browning/Winchester BPCR book & associated articles.

Brent
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JoinedCOLON Sun Nov 20, 2005 9:12 pm
LocationCOLON the most boring real estate west of Illinois

Re: Caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)

Post by Brent » Tue Nov 08, 2016 9:47 am

Thats a pretty incredible list of problems. How many rifles do you think you have handled to come up with this many problems?
I'm not from here, I just live here.

TexasMac
PostsCOLON 1033
JoinedCOLON Sun Nov 20, 2005 6:08 pm
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CONTACTCOLON

Re: Caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)

Post by TexasMac » Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:00 am

Brent wroteCOLONThats a pretty incredible list of problems. How many rifles do you think you have handled to come up with this many problems?
Brent,

I know exactly how many Browning & Winchester BPCRs I've sold, which totals a good bit over 200 to date. But most of the more recently introduced Winchester's & some of the Browning's were new from the factory without problems. I'd estimate the list was compiled from 50 or so used Browning's. With the exception of the cracked stocks during shipping all the problems are due to shooter ignorance or abuse.

Wayne
NRA Life (President's Council) Member, TSRA Life Member, NSSF Member
Click on http://www.texas-mac.com/index.html to my home page containing information on my Browning/Winchester BPCR book & associated articles.

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