Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

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Dukeofsavoy89
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Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Dukeofsavoy89 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:59 pm

So this is my first post on this sight, as I'm interested in trying out BPCR Silhouette shooting. My question is about the rule relating to which rifle are eligible for NRA competition. The snag I've hit is with this part: "of United States manufacture prior to 1896 and being typical of the era."
Must the rifle model be exclusively designed in the US? The rifle I'd like to use is a Field's Patent rifle, which was designed in 1877. The rifle fits every criteria except it's not a US design, it's from England/Great Britain. Has anyone been able to get approval for a foreign designed rifle?
I emailed the got from NRA said: "Right now I would say due to the rules that this would not be acceptable. I can bring it up to the committee at the next meeting though."
Any thoughts?

Premod70
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Re: Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Premod70 » Wed Apr 15, 2020 7:51 am

Due to it's uniqueness and unavailibility to those that compete in this sport I would say no. Now if it was American made back in the day and is made in large numbers today I would say fine. We need as many interests as possible to keep the game going and exclusion should be and is at the bottom of the list, fairness near the top.

Brent
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Re: Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Brent » Wed Apr 15, 2020 1:12 pm

I don't think you will get much relief from the committee simply because allowing the Field action then opens the door for everything else and the uniquely North American flavor of the BPCR game is lost.

Were I a match director, I would certainly let you shoot and encourage you to participate, but, insofar as NRA record book keeping goes, you wouldn't be listed.

The Field action is darn cool. One of the best, strongest, and simplest actions of all time.
I'm not from here, I just live here.

Dukeofsavoy89
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Re: Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Dukeofsavoy89 » Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:04 pm

I appreciate the replies, and both very true. Just playing devil's advocate here but unless I'm mistaken the wesson falling block rifles, which are allowed under the rules, were near identical copies of Alex Henry's design. So close in fact that he sued Wesson successfully to stop him producing his design(wish I could remember what book I read this in). So if my logic holds true there is one rifle allowed under the rules that is not a true American design, why would it be unfair to allow another one which is operation is not significantly different than a 1885 Highwall or Hepburn?
I can certainly agree that it would stray from the Old West genre but the sport is called Black Powder Cartridge Rifle Silhouette, and the Field's is a BPCR. No animosity from me if it's the rifle is not allowed, I'm just not one to shy from a healthy debate.
Thanks folks,
Erik

Brent
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Re: Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Brent » Fri Apr 17, 2020 7:27 am

There are inconsistencies in the guns allowed. Wessons may be rips on the Henry, but they were American ripoffs, so they are allowed. Pederoli and Miroku ripped off Winchesters and Sharps, but they are made over seas and at least the Miroku made for Browning/ Winchester are substantially different than the 1885s they claim to be, but they are all allowed. CPA made some modest improvements on the Stevens 44.5 model outside of the time period allowance, but they are allowed too.

So, there are variances in the basic rules. Those variances were done expressly to increase the number of players in the game, both on the manufacturing side and on the contestant side. Periodically, someone will feel it necessary to point out inconsistencies - such as the Sharps Borchardt or the Ruger #1 even, but I think the committee has done a decent job of maintaining the philosophy and intent of the rules and limiting the technology wars.

The Field action really has no wiggle room of its own to use to worm its way into the game. It never was an American, or American-like action. As fine an action as it was, it never was copied by American makers. So I don't see any reasonable path to it becoming an allowed.
I'm not from here, I just live here.

Premod70
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Re: Rifles designed in other countries eligibility

Post by Premod70 » Fri Apr 17, 2020 11:13 am

Just another thought as a reason why American only would be the number of makes that are true black powder cartridge rifles and the additional burden of what is safe and what is not. Too many makes and a good number were marginaly safe when new. Sure would be nice though to see the better foreign makes on the line as well as the cartridges of the period in use.

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